Email: info@rutland-holiday-cottage.co.uk
Web: www.rutland-holiday-cottage.co.uk
Phone: 01572 821 366
Mobile: 07841 866 750
Four star quailty self catering accommodation
 

 

Rutland Information

 

Rutland is England’s smallest county but is an idyllic rural destination offering a perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of daily life. While being a relatively hidden gem, Rutland is convenient to reach from all directions as it is situated in the heart of the East Midlands, making it the ideal location for short breaks in the UK.

Quietly nestling in the idyllic English countryside, Rutland has much to share with you; not least, fantastic Rutland Water which is Europe’s largest man made reservoir. Rutland offers a taste of traditional England, undiscovered by many and treasured by a lucky few.

The origin of the name Rutland is controversial and hotly debated. Some say it is named after a local landowner called Rota who owned a large estate in the area. Others say that the name stems from the rich red colour of the soil which is found here, and that, over time the name became Rutland. Unfortunately, it looks set to remain a mystery, as there is no conclusive evidence to prove one story or the other.
From 1974 until 1997, Rutland was part of Leicestershire. However it is now a proudly independent county and in 2007 celebrated a decade of independence.
To this day, Rutland remains one of the most charming, proud and attractive rural counties in England.

Whatever you enjoy doing Rutland has it all and has easy access to a variety of activities and events including sailing, fishing, bird watching, cycling, golf, concerts, theatre as well as some cosy pubs and excellent restaurants.
Rutland has the attractive market towns of Oakham and Uppingham and the nearby Stamford also offers some great boutique shopping, gift shops and specialist food stores.
The popular Burghley horse trials also take place here every September on the outskirts of Stamford.

The area has also recently featured in the films of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, The Da Vinci Code and the BBC’s adaptation of George Elliot’s Middlemarch.